Trying to conceive can be a stressful endeavour. We know that stress can influence reproductive health, and staying positive while trying to get pregnant can be difficult. Plus, women who are trying to conceive after suffering from a previous pregnancy loss are more likely to be suffering from depression or experience heightened stress.

Here, helpful tips on how to manage your mental health when you’re trying to conceive.

Set boundaries

Friends, family and acquaintances can be excited and ask you a billion questions that you’re not comfortable answering. Allow yourself to set boundaries and let people know when you need space, and what support looks like for you. If you’d prefer to talk about something with some friends and not with others, do that.

Share with your partner

Since you’re in this journey together, share your feelings with each other and discuss things. You might find a sense of closeness. Instead of turning sex into a chore, find ways to keep things exciting and passionate.

Find your people

Group chats and support groups are great places to find solace with other people going through what you are. Even if you don’t join in the chat yourself, reading about other people’s experiences can make you feel less alone and can give you a sense of hope.

Self-care is key

An important part of self-care is sticking to your routines. Get up, do your workout, eat your vegetables and maintain a sense of normalcy. Not only are you taking care of yourself, you’re also staying present and not allowing anything to get you down.

Shift your focus

It’s easy to get fixated on your periods, pregnancy tests or other things that signal pregnancy. Keep your approach light: buy pregnancy tests when you’ve actually missed your period and if you don’t, avoid negative self-talk.

Talk To Someone

If you’ve lost your joy from things that used to make you happy or if you’re fixated on pregnancy to the point that it’s affecting your life otherwise, see a therapist. If you’ve already suffered pregnancy loss, you should see a therapist. Professional help will give you tools to properly manage your emotions.

Sources: Cambridge University Press, Human Reproduction journal, Natalist, VeryWell Family
Reviewed by Dr Ayobami Oduntan, Zoie health educator and medical practitioner

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